Laser Eye Surgery FAQs

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What are the Main Refractive Errors Treated by Laser Eye Surgery?

Laser eye surgery, also known as vision correction or refractive surgery, refers to the handful of treatments used to correct refractive errors. In recent years, technology in this field has advanced dramatically meaning more severe prescriptions can be treated and the results are better than ever. 

The majority of these surgeries involve reshaping the clear, front part of your eye (the cornea), as it’s this that’s responsible for letting light through and focusing it on the back of your eye (the retina). Other procedures will replace the natural lens of your eye and this guide will hopefully answer some of the most frequently asked questions about the various types refractive laser eye surgery treatments available in the UK.   

Myopia (Short-Sightedness): People with myopia struggle to see things in the distance with objects often becoming blurry, but their close-up vision remains clear. .

Hyperopia (Long-Sightedness): Opposite to myopia, people with hyperopia will be able to see objects in the distance clearly but will often find that items in the near distance are blurry and fuzzy.

Presbyopia: Occurring naturally during the ageing process, presbyopia is a type of farsightedness. It’s caused as the lens hardens and loses some of its elasticity, meaning it cannot focus the light on the retina correctly when looking at close-up objects.

Astigmatism: Another common but minor eye condition, astigmatism causes distorted or blurred vision. It arises when the lens or cornea is an irregular shaped (i.e. less like a football and more like a rugby ball). The majority of glasses wearers will have a certain degree of astigmatism.

What Are the Benefits of Laser Eye Surgery?

Laser eye surgery comes with a number of benefits, and not just the fact that your vision can return to what it was before you had to wear glasses and/or contact lenses on a permanent basis.

You see, it also comes with a great success rate, with more than 95% of patients being satisfied with the results they’ve had through their surgery, even going as far as deeming it ‘life-changing’.

There’s also very little pain (if any) associated with these types of procedures, and for the majority of laser eye surgery patients, vision returns to normal (and is noticeably improved) within a few days of the surgery. Furthermore, the recovery time is quick, with no stitches or bandages being required afterwards.

Laser eye surgery procedures can also be repeated to correct your vision further down the line, which some patients will require due to their prescription levels changing again at a later stage of their life. The results of laser eye surgery are meant to last a lifetime. In the UK, regression occurs among only 5% of laser eye surgery patients. People who are likely to have regression are those with high prescriptions and/or are longsighted.

Finally, in most cases, patients won’t need to wear corrective eyewear anymore, which reduces the potential restrictions they were faced with before. However, some may require glasses when carrying out specific activities – older patients often rely on reading glasses, for example.

Am I Eligible?

  • Inclusion Criteria
  • You’re over 21 (an eye prescription must have been stable for at least two years before you undergo the surgery, and eyes continually change up until you’re 21). There is no upper age limit for laser eye surgery patients, although there are clinics that will not operate on those over 70.
  • You’re generally healthy.
  • You don’t have any allergies to anaesthesia.
  • You have a refractive error, which tends to be in the following range:
    • Up to -10.00D of nearsightedness (myopia)
    • Up to +4.00D of farsightedness (hyperopia)
    • Up to +/-6.00D of astigmatism
  • Exclusion Criteria:
  • You’re under 21 (an eye prescription must have been stable for at least two years before you undergo the surgery, and eyes continually change up until you’re 21).
  • You’re suffering from a medical condition such as diabetes, hepatitis C, the herpes virus, rheumatoid arthritis or lupus.
  • Your corneas are very thin, or you have glaucoma or cataracts.
  • You’re taking immunosuppressant drugs.
  • You’re pregnant or breastfeeding.
  • You’re diagnosed as having dry eyes.
  • You have a job that’s dependent on your eyesight (although not an exclusion per se, professional athletes, pilots and so on are told to consider the implications if the procedure does go wrong).

Laser Eye Surgery Costs By Treatment Types

Treatment Type (Prices are per eye) From To
LASEK / PRK
£1,195
£1,795
LASIK
£1,195
£2,700
LASEK (Wavefront)
£1,495
£2,450
LASIK (Wavefront)
£1,695
£3,250
ReLex SMILE
£2,495
£3,250

Typical Laser Eye Treatment Prices In National Clinics

Company Treatment Name Consultation Price Per Eye
Optical Express
LASIK with iDesign
Free
£1,495
Optegra
LASIK (blade-free)
Free
£1,795
Optimax
IntraLase® LASIK
£10 - £30
£1,695
Ultralase
Wavefront LASIK
£10 - £30
£1,695

Typical Laser Eye Treatment Prices In London / South East Clinics

Company Treatment Name Consultation Price Per Eye
Focus
LASIK (blade-free)
£25-£50 *
£2,400 – £2,800
London Vision Clinic
LASIK (blade-free)
Free
£2,600 – £3,250
Advanced Vision Care
Intralase Wavefront LASIK
£100 **
£2,100
Centre for Sight
IntraLASIK Supracor
£500 ***
£2,675

What Are the Alternatives to Laser Eye Surgery?

If you’re unable to have laser eye surgery or want to look at other available options before undergoing the procedure, there are some alternatives to consider:

Lens Surgery

Some patients who are looking for more permanent vision correction may benefit from the latest lens implantation techniques, which have evolved from cataract surgery. These are phakic intraocular lenses (PIOLs) and refractive lens exchange (RLE).

PIOLs for Myopia are almost like placing permanent contact lenses into your eyes as they don’t involve removing the natural lenses. However, as this lens is inside your eye, you aren’t as restricted as you are with contact lenses. In general, PIOLs are a good option for younger people who aren’t eligible for laser eye surgery, have a high degree of astigmatism or have a high eye prescription.

Alternatively, RLE is often recommended for people later on in life (with the onset of cataracts, a high eye prescription or who aren’t suitable for laser eye surgery) and involves the same procedure as cataract surgery. Unlike PIOLs, the natural lens of your eye is removed before being replaced with a new one (monofocal, multifocal or trifocal).

Using Contact Lenses or Glasses

Another alternative is to stick with what you’ve already got – your glasses or contact lenses.

And when weighing up your options as to whether or not this is a suitable choice for you, you’ll need to consider the limitations of contact lenses and glasses alongside the fact these vision aids (particularly glasses) are primarily risk-free. Limitations include being unable to participate in sports and the aesthetics of wearing glasses (for some). There’s also the ongoing costs involved in replacing these, and the fact contact lenses can also increase your risk of irritation and infection.

Getting Laser Eye Surgery Abroad

Sometimes, many patients think it is worth researching overseas laser eye surgery clinics to save money. If you’re considering this option and have found cheaper surgery prices abroad, there are a few things you should consider first:

Whilst the cost of the surgery perhaps may be cheaper abroad, it’s important to take into account all of the additional costs you may face. These include return flights, accommodation, days off work and insurance (when travelling abroad for a medical procedure, you won’t be covered by your standard holiday insurance, meaning you will need to take out additional cover, which could cost over £100 extra). Also, don’t forget to allow for follow-up consultations with your surgeon, too.

Unfortunately, when it comes to laser eye surgery, there isn’t a compulsory regulatory body, which means it can be difficult to find out what training a surgeon’s had and where their skills have been accredited. However, in the UK, surgeons must be on the General Medical Council’s register in order to perform procedures, so there are far more rigorous checks in place.

As time is often limited when you’re travelling abroad for surgery, you might only be offered an online consultation with your surgeon prior to the procedure. This may mean you’re not 100% comfortable with the operation as you haven’t had time to build a relationship with the surgeon and ask all the questions you want to ask.

Even though most clinics offering international procedures will have some English-speaking staff, some do not. As you’ll need to communicate effectively with them before, during and after your surgery, you may want to check this so you don’t run into any communication problems further down the line.


Before choosing a surgeon or clinic you should be able to do some thorough research on them to see if other people would recommend their services. Previous (genuine) reviews will give you a good insight into whether or not these procedures are carried out well or not.

Sadly, some countries will have far fewer regulations than we do in the UK, which is why a lot of patients travelling abroad for laser eye surgery have been often been dissatisfied with a number of things, including the quality of care received and the empathy and reliability of the surgical team.

Even though some clinics will work closely with practitioners in the UK, some do not. Therefore, you may want to check you’ll be able to receive aftercare in the UK if anything does go wrong after your surgery. In some cases, you may need to go back to the country of your operation to receive the right aftercare.

What Are the Possible Side Effects of Laser Surgery?

Even though most patients will experience some of the following side effects after their procedure, these will often improve with time. However, in some cases, they may not disappear completely.

Double vision, halos and glare

You may notice you experience double vision, halos and/or glare like symptoms, particularly at night, but these tend to only last a few days, or, at the most, a few weeks.

Dry eyes

Your tear production is temporarily decreased after LASIK, which is why your eyes may feel drier for up to six months after your operation. This, in turn, can reduce your vision’s quality.

However, to assist you throughout this period, your eye surgeon may offer you some eye drops. In rarer cases another operation may be required to plug the tear ducts and prevent them from draining moisture away from your eyes’ surface.

Eye discomfort and blurring

Often, patients will experience on-off blurring as well as discomfort to the surface of their eyes. This should improve in the first few weeks after your surgery and can be eased with the eye drops prescribed to you by your surgeon. In most cases, those with normal eye surfaces before the surgery should find there are no long-lasting issues.

Appearance

Due to some small blood leaks (subconjunctival haemorrhages) that can occur during the procedure, you may notice red blotches in your eye. This is 100% normal and doesn’t affect the overall health of your eyes. They can take around six weeks to clear up.

Infection

Although this isn’t common, the risk of infection in your eye after your surgery can increase, especially if you’ve had an operation that involves surface ablations (e.g. PRK). To prevent this risk, natural bandages are often given to you to create a sterile environment that’ll keep infections at bay and promote healthy healing in your eye. 

 

What Are the Possible Risks of Laser Eye Surgery?

As with all forms of surgery, there are some problems that can arise during or after the

operation and most can be corrected with additional surgery or changes in medication. On very rare occasions these problems can result in a serious loss of vision which is permanent but it is very unlikely to happen with latest treatments available. When issues do arise, they normally fall into one or more of the following categories:

Under Corrections 

If there isn’t enough tissue removed from your eye you might not achieve the vision you set out for. This problem is more common in those who are nearsighted and may require a repeat procedure to remove more tissue.

Over Corrections

Alternatively, it’s possible to remove too much tissue during the procedure. Because of this, it can be more difficult to correct than under corrections.

Astigmatism

Arising from uneven tissue removal, this may result in you needing contact lenses, glasses or further surgery.

Vision changes or loss

In very rare cases, you may experience vision loss due to a complication in your surgery. Some also find they don’t see as clearly or sharply as they did before.

Flap problems

Complications can arise due to the flap that’s removed or folded back during the surgery. This can cause excess tears or infection, and the epithelium may grow back abnormally.

How To Reduce Potential Side Effects and Problems

To help reduce any of the potential issues that may arise during or after your surgery, there are a number of things you can do:

Stay calm and relaxed throughout your surgery

Even though this is easier said than done, it does help the surgeon immensely if you can follow their instructions and remain calm throughout the procedure. However, as mentioned previously, there’s no need to worry too much about your eyes moving while the laser’s focused on it, as they will track this movement.

Keep your eyes well lubricated.

Every effort should be made to keep your eyes as moist as possible after laser eye surgery, using the drops provided and keeping your eyes closed while you’re awake (for the first few hours afterwards). This is particularly important after LASIK.

Use your anti-inflammatory and antibiotic drops as prescribed

This will help your eyes heal properly. Try to leave around two minutes between the two different types of eye drops, too, so each is thoroughly absorbed before the next is applied. Not sure if the first drop went in? Applying a second drop is fine.

Contact your surgeon if you have any concerns

Always get in touch with them if you have any light sensitivity, increasing pain, blurring or injury to the eye that’s followed by watering, blurred vision or pain.

Don’t swim for a week

Most surgeons will recommend this.

Avoid contact sports after LASIK surgery for a month

Non-contact sports like jogging or going to the gym are fine after surgery, though.

Always attend your follow up consultations.

You might not be aware of a problem that’s arisen after your surgery so always attend the scheduled follow up meetings with your surgeon.

What To Expect Before, During and After the Procedure

Checklist for Patients

There are a lot of things you’ll need to consider before you proceed with laser eye surgery, and it’s inevitable you’ll have lots of questions for your surgeon. Be sure to write these down so you don’t forget anything in your initial consultation. To help you come up with some questions, here are a number of things you might want to ask:

  • Does the surgeon have a Cert LRS qualification or are they on the General Medical Council’s register for ophthalmology?
  • Is the surgeon fully insured to carry out this procedure in the UK (you’re entitled to see a copy of this insurance)?
  • Is the clinic or hospital regulated?
    • England - Care Quality Commission
    • Scotland - Healthcare Improvement Scotland
    • Wales - Healthcare Inspection Wales
    • Northern Ireland - Regulatory and Quality Improvement Authority
  • How many procedures has the surgeon carried out previously using the same laser they’ll use on your eyes?
  • Does the surgeon have any reviews you can read, or are there previous patients you can talk to?
  • What are your expectations, and are these realistic? Discuss what you want from the operation and whether or not the surgeon feels this is possible.
  • Do you feel comfortable talking to the surgeon? Have they given you enough time to talk through the procedure and answer your questions?

Laser Eye Surgery FAQs

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Laser eye surgery, also known as vision correction or refractive surgery, refers to the handful of treatments used to correct refractive errors. In recent years, technology in this field has advanced dramatically meaning more severe prescriptions can be treated and the results are better than ever. 

The majority of these surgeries involve reshaping the clear, front part of your eye (the cornea), as it’s this that’s responsible for letting light through and focusing it on the back of your eye (the retina). Other procedures will replace the natural lens of your eye and this guide will hopefully answer some of the most frequently asked questions about the various types refractive laser eye surgery treatments available in the UK.   

What are the Main Refractive Errors Treated by Laser Eye Surgery?

Myopia (Short-Sightedness): People with myopia struggle to see things in the distance with objects often becoming blurry, but their close-up vision remains clear. .

Hyperopia (Long-Sightedness): Opposite to myopia, people with hyperopia will be able to see objects in the distance clearly but will often find that items in the near distance are blurry and fuzzy.

Presbyopia: Occurring naturally during the ageing process, presbyopia is a type of farsightedness. It’s caused as the lens hardens and loses some of its elasticity, meaning it cannot focus the light on the retina correctly when looking at close-up objects.

Astigmatism: Another common but minor eye condition, astigmatism causes distorted or blurred vision. It arises when the lens or cornea is an irregular shaped (i.e. less like a football and more like a rugby ball). The majority of glasses wearers will have a certain degree of astigmatism.

What Are the Benefits of Laser Eye Surgery?

Laser eye surgery comes with a number of benefits, and not just the fact that your vision can return to what it was before you had to wear glasses and/or contact lenses on a permanent basis.

You see, it also comes with a great success rate, with more than 95% of patients being satisfied with the results they’ve had through their surgery, even going as far as deeming it ‘life-changing’.

There’s also very little pain (if any) associated with these types of procedures, and for the majority of laser eye surgery patients, vision returns to normal (and is noticeably improved) within a few days of the surgery. Furthermore, the recovery time is quick, with no stitches or bandages being required afterwards.

Laser eye surgery procedures can also be repeated to correct your vision further down the line, which some patients will require due to their prescription levels changing again at a later stage of their life. The results of laser eye surgery are meant to last a lifetime. In the UK, regression occurs among only 5% of laser eye surgery patients. People who are likely to have regression are those with high prescriptions and/or are longsighted.

Finally, in most cases, patients won’t need to wear corrective eyewear anymore, which reduces the potential restrictions they were faced with before. However, some may require glasses when carrying out specific activities – older patients often rely on reading glasses, for example.

  • Inclusion Criteria
  • You’re over 21 (an eye prescription must have been stable for at least two years before you undergo the surgery, and eyes continually change up until you’re 21). There is no upper age limit for laser eye surgery patients, although there are clinics that will not operate on those over 70.
  • You’re generally healthy.
  • You don’t have any allergies to anaesthesia.
  • You have a refractive error, which tends to be in the following range:
    • Up to -10.00D of nearsightedness (myopia)
    • Up to +4.00D of farsightedness (hyperopia)
    • Up to +/-6.00D of astigmatism
  • Exclusion Criteria:
  • You’re under 21 (an eye prescription must have been stable for at least two years before you undergo the surgery, and eyes continually change up until you’re 21).
  • You’re suffering from a medical condition such as diabetes, hepatitis C, the herpes virus, rheumatoid arthritis or lupus.
  • Your corneas are very thin, or you have glaucoma or cataracts.
  • You’re taking immunosuppressant drugs.
  • You’re pregnant or breastfeeding.
  • You’re diagnosed as having dry eyes.
  • You have a job that’s dependent on your eyesight (although not an exclusion per se, professional athletes, pilots and so on are told to consider the implications if the procedure does go wrong).

Laser Eye Surgery Costs By Treatment Types

Treatment Type (Prices are per eye) From To
LASEK / PRK
£1,195
£1,795
LASIK
£1,195
£2,700
LASEK (Wavefront)
£1,495
£2,450
LASIK (Wavefront)
£1,695
£3,250
ReLex SMILE
£2,495
£3,250

Typical Laser Eye Treatment Prices In National Clinics

Company Treatment Name Consultation Price Per Eye
Optical Express
LASIK with iDesign
Free
£1,495
Optegra
LASIK (blade-free)
Free
£1,795
Optimax
IntraLase® LASIK
£10 - £30
£1,695
Ultralase
Wavefront LASIK
£10 - £30
£1,695

Typical Laser Eye Treatment Prices In London / South East Clinics

Company Treatment Name Consultation Price Per Eye
Focus
LASIK (blade-free)
£25-£50 *
£2,400 – £2,800
London Vision Clinic
LASIK (blade-free)
Free
£2,600 – £3,250
Advanced Vision Care
Intralase Wavefront LASIK
£100 **
£2,100
Centre for Sight
IntraLASIK Supracor
£500 ***
£2,675

What Are the Alternatives to Laser Eye Surgery?

If you’re unable to have laser eye surgery or want to look at other available options before undergoing the procedure, there are some alternatives to consider:

Lens Surgery

Some patients who are looking for more permanent vision correction may benefit from the latest lens implantation techniques, which have evolved from cataract surgery. These are phakic intraocular lenses (PIOLs) and refractive lens exchange (RLE).

PIOLs for Myopia are almost like placing permanent contact lenses into your eyes as they don’t involve removing the natural lenses. However, as this lens is inside your eye, you aren’t as restricted as you are with contact lenses. In general, PIOLs are a good option for younger people who aren’t eligible for laser eye surgery, have a high degree of astigmatism or have a high eye prescription.

Alternatively, RLE is often recommended for people later on in life (with the onset of cataracts, a high eye prescription or who aren’t suitable for laser eye surgery) and involves the same procedure as cataract surgery. Unlike PIOLs, the natural lens of your eye is removed before being replaced with a new one (monofocal, multifocal or trifocal).

Using Contact Lenses or Glasses

Another alternative is to stick with what you’ve already got – your glasses or contact lenses.

And when weighing up your options as to whether or not this is a suitable choice for you, you’ll need to consider the limitations of contact lenses and glasses alongside the fact these vision aids (particularly glasses) are primarily risk-free. Limitations include being unable to participate in sports and the aesthetics of wearing glasses (for some). There’s also the ongoing costs involved in replacing these, and the fact contact lenses can also increase your risk of irritation and infection.

Getting Laser Eye Surgery Abroad

Sometimes, many patients think it is worth researching overseas laser eye surgery clinics to save money. If you’re considering this option and have found cheaper surgery prices abroad, there are a few things you should consider first:

Whilst the cost of the surgery perhaps may be cheaper abroad, it’s important to take into account all of the additional costs you may face. These include return flights, accommodation, days off work and insurance (when travelling abroad for a medical procedure, you won’t be covered by your standard holiday insurance, meaning you will need to take out additional cover, which could cost over £100 extra). Also, don’t forget to allow for follow-up consultations with your surgeon, too.

Unfortunately, when it comes to laser eye surgery, there isn’t a compulsory regulatory body, which means it can be difficult to find out what training a surgeon’s had and where their skills have been accredited. However, in the UK, surgeons must be on the General Medical Council’s register in order to perform procedures, so there are far more rigorous checks in place.

As time is often limited when you’re travelling abroad for surgery, you might only be offered an online consultation with your surgeon prior to the procedure. This may mean you’re not 100% comfortable with the operation as you haven’t had time to build a relationship with the surgeon and ask all the questions you want to ask.

Even though most clinics offering international procedures will have some English-speaking staff, some do not. As you’ll need to communicate effectively with them before, during and after your surgery, you may want to check this so you don’t run into any communication problems further down the line.


Before choosing a surgeon or clinic you should be able to do some thorough research on them to see if other people would recommend their services. Previous (genuine) reviews will give you a good insight into whether or not these procedures are carried out well or not.

Sadly, some countries will have far fewer regulations than we do in the UK, which is why a lot of patients travelling abroad for laser eye surgery have been often been dissatisfied with a number of things, including the quality of care received and the empathy and reliability of the surgical team.

Even though some clinics will work closely with practitioners in the UK, some do not. Therefore, you may want to check you’ll be able to receive aftercare in the UK if anything does go wrong after your surgery. In some cases, you may need to go back to the country of your operation to receive the right aftercare.

What Are the Possible Side Effects of Laser Surgery?

Even though most patients will experience some of the following side effects after their procedure, these will often improve with time. However, in some cases, they may not disappear completely.

Double vision, halos and glare

You may notice you experience double vision, halos and/or glare like symptoms, particularly at night, but these tend to only last a few days, or, at the most, a few weeks.

Dry eyes

Your tear production is temporarily decreased after LASIK, which is why your eyes may feel drier for up to six months after your operation. This, in turn, can reduce your vision’s quality.

However, to assist you throughout this period, your eye surgeon may offer you some eye drops. In rarer cases another operation may be required to plug the tear ducts and prevent them from draining moisture away from your eyes’ surface.

Eye discomfort and blurring

Often, patients will experience on-off blurring as well as discomfort to the surface of their eyes. This should improve in the first few weeks after your surgery and can be eased with the eye drops prescribed to you by your surgeon. In most cases, those with normal eye surfaces before the surgery should find there are no long-lasting issues.

Appearance

Due to some small blood leaks (subconjunctival haemorrhages) that can occur during the procedure, you may notice red blotches in your eye. This is 100% normal and doesn’t affect the overall health of your eyes. They can take around six weeks to clear up.

Infection

Although this isn’t common, the risk of infection in your eye after your surgery can increase, especially if you’ve had an operation that involves surface ablations (e.g. PRK). To prevent this risk, natural bandages are often given to you to create a sterile environment that’ll keep infections at bay and promote healthy healing in your eye. 

 

What Are the Possible Risks of Laser Eye Surgery?

As with all forms of surgery, there are some problems that can arise during or after the

operation and most can be corrected with additional surgery or changes in medication. On very rare occasions these problems can result in a serious loss of vision which is permanent but it is very unlikely to happen with latest treatments available. When issues do arise, they normally fall into one or more of the following categories:

Under Corrections 

If there isn’t enough tissue removed from your eye you might not achieve the vision you set out for. This problem is more common in those who are nearsighted and may require a repeat procedure to remove more tissue.

Over Corrections

Alternatively, it’s possible to remove too much tissue during the procedure. Because of this, it can be more difficult to correct than under corrections.

Astigmatism

Arising from uneven tissue removal, this may result in you needing contact lenses, glasses or further surgery.

Vision changes or loss

In very rare cases, you may experience vision loss due to a complication in your surgery. Some also find they don’t see as clearly or sharply as they did before.

Flap problems

Complications can arise due to the flap that’s removed or folded back during the surgery. This can cause excess tears or infection, and the epithelium may grow back abnormally.

How To Reduce Potential Side Effects and Problems

To help reduce any of the potential issues that may arise during or after your surgery, there are a number of things you can do:

Stay calm and relaxed throughout your surgery

Even though this is easier said than done, it does help the surgeon immensely if you can follow their instructions and remain calm throughout the procedure. However, as mentioned previously, there’s no need to worry too much about your eyes moving while the laser’s focused on it, as they will track this movement.

Keep your eyes well lubricated.

Every effort should be made to keep your eyes as moist as possible after laser eye surgery, using the drops provided and keeping your eyes closed while you’re awake (for the first few hours afterwards). This is particularly important after LASIK.

Use your anti-inflammatory and antibiotic drops as prescribed

This will help your eyes heal properly. Try to leave around two minutes between the two different types of eye drops, too, so each is thoroughly absorbed before the next is applied. Not sure if the first drop went in? Applying a second drop is fine.

Contact your surgeon if you have any concerns

Always get in touch with them if you have any light sensitivity, increasing pain, blurring or injury to the eye that’s followed by watering, blurred vision or pain.

Don’t swim for a week

Most surgeons will recommend this.

Avoid contact sports after LASIK surgery for a month

Non-contact sports like jogging or going to the gym are fine after surgery, though.

Always attend your follow up consultations.

You might not be aware of a problem that’s arisen after your surgery so always attend the scheduled follow up meetings with your surgeon.

What To Expect Before, During and After the Procedure

Checklist for Patients

There are a lot of things you’ll need to consider before you proceed with laser eye surgery, and it’s inevitable you’ll have lots of questions for your surgeon. Be sure to write these down so you don’t forget anything in your initial consultation. To help you come up with some questions, here are a number of things you might want to ask:

  • Does the surgeon have a Cert LRS qualification or are they on the General Medical Council’s register for ophthalmology?
  • Is the surgeon fully insured to carry out this procedure in the UK (you’re entitled to see a copy of this insurance)?
  • Is the clinic or hospital regulated?
    • England - Care Quality Commission
    • Scotland - Healthcare Improvement Scotland
    • Wales - Healthcare Inspection Wales
    • Northern Ireland - Regulatory and Quality Improvement Authority
  • How many procedures has the surgeon carried out previously using the same laser they’ll use on your eyes?
  • Does the surgeon have any reviews you can read, or are there previous patients you can talk to?
  • What are your expectations, and are these realistic? Discuss what you want from the operation and whether or not the surgeon feels this is possible.
  • Do you feel comfortable talking to the surgeon? Have they given you enough time to talk through the procedure and answer your questions?

Laser Eye Surgery Hub
Spaces, 9 Greyfriars Rd, Reading, RG1 1NU

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